Sunday Services Videos

 

Past Sunday Service Youtube Videos

Index to Monthly Videos

December-2021

January-2022

February-2022

March-2022

April-2022

May-2022

June-2022

July-2022

August-2022

September-2022

October-2022

November-2022

Sunday, Dec. 5, 2021

Adele Jacobson

Speaker – Adele Jacobson

Biography:

As a child, Adele loved music, but never got serious about it until she retired. A musician she played with introduced her to therapeutic music, and the training she needed to become a certified music practitioner. When she started playing locally, she recognized the need for more musicians, as she could not satisfy the need for the music by herself. She started Music in Medicine, as a nonprofit three years ago to expand therapeutic music within Citrus County. They play in hospitals, a hospice facility, and a skilled nursing facility/memory care unit.

Topic: “Music in Medicine”

Adele spoke to our congregation in 2019. Today, she will give a brief refresher about what Music in Medicine is, what they do, and the progress they have made in meeting their mission. She and her team will demonstrate the various styles of music used for different patient conditions. The balance of time will be music presented by a student intern Sue Silber and the vice president of Music in Medicine, Jim Davis.

Sunday, Dec. 12, 2021 – Grand Opening at the Fellowship

Gaia and Kurland Davies

Speakers – Gaia and Kurland Davies

Biography:

Gaia and Kurland Davies spent most of their adult years studying psychology and learning to be counselors. They are spending their senior years studying being human and learning to be of service to our fellow humans and Earth. They are also exploring many different spiritual beliefs and practices. They try not to take themselves too seriously.

Topic: “’Tis the Season! ”

Yes, we know — The Christmas decorations have been up for months! And we are sick of them and holiday music! But from late November to early January, there are a dozen or so holy days, festivals, or commemorations of different religions, spiritual practices, and philosophies. As Unitarian Universalists, we respect the essence of all these sources of wisdom. Some of us participate in these celebrations. Gaia and Kurtland will take you on a brief and occasionally humorous exploration of some of these special days and look at the questions of how these days are related to each other and to our UU principles and sources. They will explain how we can honor them in these times.

Sunday, Dec. 21, 2021

Speaker – Greg Greenway

Greg Greenway

Biography:

Greg Greenway was born in Richmond, Va., and after graduating from the College of William & Mary, he moved to Boston, Mass., for its rich singer/songwriter tradition. Since then, Greg has played Carnegie Hall, been heard on NPR’s “All Things Considered,” and “Folk Stage,” and had his song, “Driving in Massachusetts,” played on “Car Talk.” He was a founding member of the highly successful folk trio, Brother Sun, and is now, when not touring solo, one half of “Deeper Than the Skin: A Musical Presentation on Race in America,” with his friend of over 30 years, Reggie Harris.

Topic: “Spirituality of Breath”

Unable to post this video due to copyright permissions.

Sunday, Dec. 26, 2021

Speaker – The Rev. Ben Bortin

The Rev. Ben Bortin

Biography:

The Rev. Ben Bortin graduated from the University of California with a major in history, specializing in Asian history. He is also a graduate of Starr King School for the Ministry in Berkeley, California. He has served as minister for UU congregations in Duluth, Minn., and Staten Island, N.Y., and as Membership Coordinator for the UU Congregation at Shelter Rock in Manhasset, N.Y. Currently, he is a chaplain at Zucker Hillside Psychiatric Hospital in Queens, N.Y.

His denominational and community involvements have included serving as President of the UU United Nations Office and on the board of Project Hospitality, an organization serving homeless and other limited people in Staten Island, N.Y.

Topic: “New Year, New Resolves, New Hope”

Judaism tells us the new year begins in September, the start of the year for many public schools and UU congregations. The Chinese say the year begins in February, and the Persians say it starts in March. But the global consensus tends to hold that the curtain rises on the new year on Jan. 1.

We need new beginnings in life. A new year gives us an opportunity for emotional and spiritual renewal, for a new dawn, however dark the hours leading up to it have been. We joke about breaking resolutions as soon as we make them – but some are kept, which enhance and even save lives. With the new year comes new possibilities, and indeed, new hope.

Services start at 10:30 a.m.

We are open for in person services with masks and social distancing. In addition, the services are also available live via Zoom. Please send a request to [email protected] for the link.

Sunday, Jan. 2, 2022

Vanessa Fuller Brown

Speaker – Vanessa Fuller Brown

Biography:

Vanessa Fuller-Brown is a lifelong student, educator, and practitioner of the Sacred Arts and Sciences within humanity’s Wisdom Traditions. Both professional fine artist and social artist, she is a certified drum facilitator and sound healing practitioner, pioneering Rhythm Arts Programs as powerful tools for self-expression, transformation, and community building for all ages. As a Minister of The Divine Arts, Vanessa imparts wisdom through ceremonial arts and earth practices, educational workshops, and creative mentorship. “Falling into Rhythm is a Natural Path to Wellness and Vitality, and the Way of The Heart,” according to Vanessa.

Topic: Community Drum Circle

As drum circles grow increasingly popular, science is realizing the ever increasing health benefits of drumming and the advantage of drumming in a group. The presentation will introduce sound and rhythm as an instrument for healing, personal growth, and community building, inviting mental, emotional, and physical wellbeing. Included in the presentation will be an introduction to drum circles and their heritage, the djembe and percussion instruments. This will be followed with guided drumming instruction and a facilitated rhythm circle.

Sunday, Jan. 9, 2022

Judi Siegal

Speakers – Judi Siegal

Biography:

Judi is a native of Connecticut and frequent speaker to the UUs. She is a graduate of Adelphi University and is a retired Jewish educator. Many remember her column on Judaism which ran for several years in the Citrus County Chronicle and the Marion Citizen. She is active in her community and enjoys reading and RVing. She has three grandchildren who are the joy of her life.

Topic: Jewish Magic

Magic is all around us in our daily lives. Join me as we explore the magical side of the Jewish faith from hamsas to golems, mezuzahs to chai necklaces and others in between.

Sunday, Jan. 16, 2022

Speaker – Bishop Al L. Hopkins

Topic: Political Action as a Spiritual Endeavor

Sunday, Jan. 23, 2022

Speaker – UU Rev Brock Leach

UU Rev Brock Leach

Biography:

Rev. Brock Leach lives in Sarasota and works for the Unitarian Universalist Association as executive consultant for emerging ministries, helping develop and lead denominational efforts to support religious innovators.

In Sarasota, Brock volunteers on the boards of Children First, Sarasota County’s Head Start agency, the Education Foundation of Sarasota County, and the Sarasota African American Cultural Coalition. He chairs the Professional Advisory Group for Pastoral Care at Tampa General Hospital. He also serves on the board of Protect Our Defenders, a national organization that supports victims of sexual assault in the military and spearheaded the successful effort to reform the military justice system recently passed by Congress.

Brock is currently a Doctor of Ministry student at Boston University’s School of Theology.

Topic: Living Abundantly

The last year has made it clear that humanity is at an inflection point, with disease, climate, and resource pressures stressing the very systems that sustain life. Yet, we also know that after a point, more people and more consumption don’t add to our wellbeing anyway. Can we redirect our evolutionary drive to create abundant human life toward a shared practice of living more abundantly?

Sunday, Jan. 30, 2022

Speaker – Sally Smith-Adams

Services start at 10:30 a.m.

We are open for in person services with masks and social distancing. In addition, the services are also available live via Zoom. Please send a request to [email protected] for the link.

Sunday, Feb. 6, 2022

Sonya Mallard, Coordinator Harry Moore Museum

Speaker – Sonya Mallard, Coordinator Harry Moore Museum

Biography:

Sonya Mallard is the executive director of S&T Health Consulting Group, Inc. (Brevard Aids Services), a nonprofit 501C (3). She serves her community as an HIV educator, tester, and advocate. Every other Friday morning at 5 a.m., she goes to the methadone clinic to teach HIV awareness and test clients for HIV. She runs a teen talk program that provides informational dialogue with youth to help them make better choices in a real, raw, and responsible way. She is the cultural center cordinator of the Harry T. and Harriette V. Moore Memorial Park and Museum in Mims, Fla., and shares the legacy of the Moores. She also finds time to write for the only African American Newspaper, “Ebony News Today,” in Brevard County, and is a blogger with the Wells Project. She believes in community engagement and is the first vice president of the North Brevard Chapter of the NAACP, a board member of North Brevard Democratic Club, and a member of the National Congress of Black Women.

Topic: The Legacy of the Moores

Dec. 25, 2021, marked the 70th anniversary of the death of the civil rights martyrs, Harry T. and Harriette V. Moore. They were educators, civil rights activists, orange grove owners, community organizers, church trustees, college graduates, NAACP members, president of the Brevard County Chapter of the NAACP, president of the Florida State Teacher’s Association for Colored Teachers, and co-founder of the Progressive Voters League. Their place in history is forever synonymous with the day we celebrate, as a nation, the birth of Jesus Christ, Christmas.

Sunday, Feb. 13, 2022

Sunshine Arnold

Speakers – Sunshine Arnold, LCSW CASA

Biography:

Sunshine Arnold, LCSW, is currently the CEO at the Citrus County Abuse Shelter Association, Inc. (CASA). Additionally, Arnold is a licensed clinical social worker and operates SALT Therapy, a private psychotherapy practice. She is the former program director for the University of Florida Child Protection Team (CPT), and successfully managed and administered the team for seven years across over 10 counties. Arnold is a trained forensic interviewer and has been conducting forensic interviews of child victims of sexual and physical abuse since 2006. Arnold was instrumental in establishing Jessie’s Place — the first child advocacy center in Citrus County. Arnold graduated from Florida State University with a BSW and received her MSW from FSU as well. Arnold is a graduate of the 2013 Leadership Citrus program and is involved in Citrus County through volunteerism. She has served on several nonprofit boards. She is a member of the Citrus County Chronicle Editorial Board, and is a regular guest columnist and frequently submits pieces with a focus on intimate partner violence and women’s rights. Arnold is a published author and contributor to works on child abuse and most recently, the book, “What Doesn’t Kill Her.”

Topic: Domestic Violence and the American Public

I will speak about domestic violence in general, and also address the media attention of the recent Gabby Petito case, as well as why women of color do not seem to have the same attention. Additionally, the discussion includes the intersection of domestic violence and race, as well as how to improve our society’s response to domestic violence.

Sunday, Feb. 20, 2022

Speaker – The Rev. Bruce Seaman

The Rev. Bruce Seaman

The Rev. Bruce Seaman is a retired Presbyterian Church, USA minister who has lately been obsessed with today’s story, trying to answer a bunch of “why” questions for which he believes he now has some solid answers. Eventually he plans to return to writing a book about how the church is not what Jesus wanted. He has been married for 40 years to Nancy, the benefits supervisor for the Marion County School Board. They have two adult children: newlywed Ray, who is a political activist in his own business, building websites and producing digital services while also doing land sales, and Rachel, who is a science education designer for online programs for the University of Florida.

Topic: A Lesson in Local Black History

An odd slice of Marion County history is the Marshall Plantation raid by black Union soldiers in March 1865, just a month before the war’s end on April 9, 1865. The last organized Union military action in Florida, this was the only engagement in Marion County. The exceptional nature of the raid has been clouded by historical revisionism by apologists of the Confederacy. The raid was planned, led, and carried out by black Union soldiers, a rarity (if not unique) since white officers planned and led all operations. These raiders also sought to do what the white leaders had been unable to do — to win (for once) over their Confederate nemesis, Captain J.J. Dickison, who used knowledge of the terrain and informants across the countryside to foil Union endeavors in Florida repeatedly. The raiders’ plan was crazy-dangerous, but they had points to make to their white commanding officers before the war was over. Could they succeed where others failed?

Sunday, Feb. 27, 2022

Speaker – Joe Jencks

Joe Jencks

Biography:

Joe Jencks is a 22-year veteran of the international folk circuit, an award-winning songwriter and a celebrated vocalist based in the Chicago area. He is known for his performances of musical beauty, social consciousness, and spiritual exploration. Joe delivers engaged musical narratives, filled with heart, soul, groove, and grit. Blending well-crafted instrumentals and vivid songwriting, Jencks serves it all up with a lyric baritone voice that has the edgy richness of a good sea-salt caramel. Co-founder of the harmony trio, Brother Sun, Jencks has penned several No.1 folk songs, including the ever-relevant “Lady of the Harbor.” He has become a fan favorite throughout North America and beyond. Joe has performed and preached in over 200 Unitarian Universalist congregations in the U.S., Canada, and Ireland, and is also a dual U.S.-Irish citizen. Jencks also has been a cultural ambassador with the U.S. State Department.
For more information, please visit: www.joejencks.com.

Topic: Immigration Issues and Deportee Issues

Services start at 10:30 a.m.

We are open for in person services with masks and social distancing. In addition, the services are also available live via Zoom. Please send a request to [email protected] for the link.

Sunday, Mar. 6, 2022

Dee Collier

Speaker – Dee Collier

Biography:

Whether she’s referred to as “Annie Oakley,” “Little Miss Sure Shot,” or “Watanya Cicilla,” you would recognize her as an American sharp-shooter, who became a much-loved international performer. But what was she really like? How was her incredible talent discovered? What events in her early years led to her character qualities? And what connection does she have with Central Florida? You’re about to find out the answers to all of these questions and more as Dee Collier, a former elementary school teacher, history and drama enthusiast, brings to life the one and only “Annie Oakley.”

Topic: Annie Oakley

Annie Oakley learned shooting skills as a child. Eventually, she became the best-known sharp-shooter in the world. But there was so much more to her than that. Her character qualities helped her survive a difficult childhood and eventually support young women who had a great deal of potential without the means to achieve it.

Sunday, Mar. 13, 2022

Amy Weintraub, Progress Florida

Speakers – Amy Weintraub, Progress Florida

Biography:

Amy Weintraub is the Reproductive Rights Program Director at Progress Florida and chairs the Florida NOW Reproductive Rights Task Force. She is a seasoned, award-winning organizer, who has worked most of her adult life identifying, educating, and activating citizens toward social justice. She is heavily involved with the League of Women Voters St. Petersburg, Pinellas NOW, and the statewide Floridians for Reproductive Freedom coalition. Amy was a key leader of Women’s March St. Pete 2017, which saw more than 20,000 people gather to advance women’s issues — the largest public protest in St. Pete history. Prior to moving to Florida in 2015, Amy lived in her home state of West Virginia, where she led efforts within organizations such as WV FREE (West Virginia Focus: Reproductive Education and Equality), Covenant House of West Virginia, and Planned Parenthood. She is a UU and was a leader in her congregation in Charleston, W.V., for many years, including serving for years as board president, vice president, treasurer, and worship associate. Amy lives in South St. Petersburg with her spouse. They have two children in college.

Topic: Beyond Roe: Reproductive Rights in Florida

Amy Weintraub, Reproductive Rights Program Director for Progress Florida, will offer reflections on the state of reproductive freedom in our state. She will discuss the relevance of the second principle and how UUs can position themselves to be resources for those in need of abortion care, even in the face of abortion bans and the potential end of the Roe v. Wade decision.

Sunday, Mar. 20, 2022

Speaker – Jim Davis

Jim Davis

Jim Davis was born and raised in central Ohio and attended Capital University, The Ohio State University, The New School in New York City, Central Missouri State University, and Florida State University. During his junior year in college, he began writing poems and won several awards. His scribblings continued through a stint with Vista (Volunteers in Service to America) in New York City and in graduate studies. Life intruded. Music and poems were set aside. Near retirement, music wandered back. Poetry, as an adjunct to the search inward and outward for meaning, flew in through a hole in the screen. Jim has published one book of poems called “Inner Voices” and the second, tentatively called “Nostos,” is in the wings.

Topic: Nostos: Poems Attempting a Return to Home

The word “Nostos,” from Greek, means a yearning to return home. Poetry, like meditation, leads us to self-discovery.

Here’s a sample: “Like a mosquito that surreptitiously buzzes into your bedroom while you are asleep and bites in an inappropriate place, certain wisdom finds a hole in the screen and fills its appetite on your blood. You slowly waken with an itch. Follow your curiosity and don’t fix the screen.”

“Nostos,” my second collection of poems, examines personal influences as we travel through our lives – persons, locations, thoughts, and musical moments, which remind me of home. Yet, we gradually learn that home is a convenient fiction for the sense of security, comfort, and safety that abides within or that we seek in our lives.

These words, my poems, are the products of seeking.

Sunday, Mar. 27, 2022

Speaker – Annie Bumgarner

Annie Bumgarner

Biography:

Annie has a special interest in exploring wellness in others and supporting their inner healer.

She is a Therapeutic Recreation Specialist and has led numerous workshops on the value of PLAY and wellness. She is on the certification path of NVC, Nonviolent Communication, to help teach a language of love and oneness. She is the Licensed Unity Teacher at Unity of Citrus, Lecanto, where she teaches classes, does spiritual counseling, and is on numerous teams to support Unity. She loves attending workshops on NVC, silent retreats, and enjoys any topic that takes her out of her comfort zone.

In addition, she is an owner of an import company with her husband, Arbuth.

She thrives on learning and believes that wellness and spiritual growth are a lifelong process of choices and renewal that create quality of living.

Topic: Be Present

Our minds can continually distract us from the “present” moment. We begin to focus on the past, future, or a belief system that keeps us stuck in our thoughts.

Can we become curious with our minds and remain “present?” What can we ‘see” when we set our intentions to breathe into the present moment?

How would we “see” our Unitarian Universalist principles in the present moment?

Services start at 10:30 a.m.

We are open for in person services with masks and social distancing. In addition, the services are also available live via Zoom. Please send a request to [email protected] for the link.

Sunday, Apr. 3, 2022

Lynne Westmoreland

Speaker – Lynne Westmoreland

Biography:

After a 30-year career in music, Lynne Westmoreland returned to graduate work in Humane Education. Humane education considers the intersectionality of human rights, animal protection, environmental concerns, and how our media and culture, beyond our conscious awareness, indoctrinate us to live in ways that are in direct conflict with our most deeply held values. Lynne’s work as a humane educator has been in UU faith communities, through teaching meditation and mindful communication, and with end-of-life work. Lynne has been a Unitarian for about 40 years and finds deep commonality between our seven principles and Humane Education.

Topic: Talk Is Cheap

Unitarian Universalists have a long history of acting on behalf of our deeply held belief that everyone should be accorded dignity, respect, equal rights, and inclusion and we discuss that belief often in our services, our outreach, and our daily lived lives. Simultaneously, we are stymied by the fact that more people of color are not drawn to our communities. What more can we do to make everyone feel welcome, respected, and valued as members of our communities?

Sunday, Apr. 10, 2022

Annual Meeting

Sunday, Apr. 17, 2022

Speaker – Carole Yorke

Carole Yorke

Rev. Carole has been visiting us at NCUU since about 2000, and is delighted that you continue to invite her to guest preach. Now retired in Port St. Lucie with her three Pomeranians, she has served three churches in Florida. She was ordained in Plainfield, NJ, almost 25 years ago and continues to preach occasionally, do memorial services, and lead bereavement groups at the UU Fellowship of Vero Beach.

Topic: We Can Roll Our Own Rocks

Celebrating the earth’s resurrection rhythms at this time of year is fine, as far as it goes. But this Easter morning, I am looking for something spiritually deeper and more theologically sustaining to affirm in my heart. This Easter (when war, violence, hatred, and suffering are so prevalent — and hope, peace and gentleness so elusive), I am personally seeking a meaning for Easter that will make a deep-down and sustaining difference in my spiritual life — and last longer in my heart than a daffodil. So, what Easter meaning can arrive at our Unitarian Universalist hearts, making a real and transforming difference?

Sunday, Apr. 24, 2022

Speaker – James Schear, Ph.D

Services start at 10:30 a.m.

We are open for in person services with masks and social distancing. In addition, the services are also available live via Zoom. Please send a request to [email protected] for the link.

Sunday, May 1, 2022

Dr. Jeff Nall

Speaker – Dr. Jeff Nall

Biography:

Dr. Jeffrey Nall teaches philosophy and humanities courses for Indian River State College and the University of Central Florida. Dr. Nall also teaches courses in Florida Atlantic University’s Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies department. He recently began a Substack newsletter and Podcast devoted to exploring the insights of the humanities to everyday life. For more information go to JeffreyNall.substack.com

Topic: Getting Our Priorities Straight: Humanities and the Art of Living

The arts and humanities are often diminished as a frivolous or fringe area of serious study. These areas of cultural expression and inquiry continue to face political pressure as public institutions face funding cuts and ongoing demands to center education on strictly defined workplace roles. In this talk, Dr. Jeffrey Nall draws on his experience as a high school dropout turned humanities professor to argue that the humanities’ lessons in the art of living are an essential component of a complete education, regardless of our career choices. Great works of performing, visual, and language arts spiritually and morally fortify us. What’s more, they help us recognize the too often overlooked distinction between the means and ends of life—the secular and the sacred. The fact that the humanities continue to be diminished as frivolous is itself evidence, argues Nall, of a lack of genuine appreciation for this elemental distinction.

Sunday, May 8, 2022

Bob Benner

Speaker – Bob Benner

Biography:

Bob has worn many hats on his life’s journey. Recently, he has added the roles of nurse, chef, housekeeper, ship captain, maintenance person, and PT aide to his list as he helps Jean rehabilitate her new knee. Their farm on Long Island is calling them home now. They hope to be back lakeside next November.

Topic: Transitions: Past, Present, Future

Humans have experienced changes in their immediate world that have shaped their lives, often with unforeseen consequences. Do these developments lead to progress or does our quality of life diminish? We will examine a few transitory discoveries, then ask the congregation to predict developments to come.

Sunday, May 15, 2022

Speaker – UU Rev. Phil Schulman

UU Rev. Phil Schulman

Rev. Schulman is a life-long ecology, peace, and justice activist, who has spent 29 years working for human rights in the field of mental health. After graduating from Starr King School for the Ministry in 1989, Phillip brought trauma-informed peer counseling to a hospital addiction unit in Shreveport, La. He created a “spiritual assessment” that won praise from the Joint Commission for Accreditation of Hospitals. In 1998, he directed the creation of a program to reduce the amount of force and violence in an upstate New York county’s mental health crisis response. Since then, he has organized and supported numerous “communities of care,” using principles of peer support and nonviolence. He has served as minister to congregations in California, New Jersey, St. John of the United States Virgin Islands, and San Antonio and Houston, Texas.

Topic: Is Enlightenment Desirable?

Today’s sermon is a “Dharma Talk.” We’ll take a foray into a few core ideas attributed to Siddhartha Gautama, aka Buddha. This service aims to increase accessibility and embracing of practical teachings from Buddhist traditions. It’s suited for anyone interested in Buddhism, developing mindfulness, or experiencing lasting peace.

Sunday, May 22, 2022

Speaker – Loren Smith

Loren Smith

Biography:

Loren Smith, brother of NCUU member Lowell Smith, spent 41 years as a family physician in rural West Virginia. Following his practice career, he served 10 years as the county health director. In his spare time, he created and manages a bluebird trail of 21 bird boxes and recently helped develop a children’s nature park. He was married for 49 years until the loss of his wife in a fatal accident and has four children.

Topic: Preserving Farmland

Today’s speaker will emphasize farmland as a part of our heritage and reasons for concern of its loss. He hopes to increase your awareness of the need to preserve farmland and what you and I can do about it.

Sunday, May 29, 2022

Speaker – Linda Starkweather

Linda Starkweather

Biography:

After a career in teaching and theater, Linda spends her retirement as an artist, activist, theater professional, carpenter, and snowbird, spending half the year in Dunnellon and the other half in Naples, N.Y. She and her partner, Lynne, have brought their unique perspective and philosophy to many UU congregations in both New York and Florida. They share their home with a Buddhist and a terrorist — both beloved rescue dogs from Florida.

Topic: Deep Adaptation

Deep Adaptation is a concept, agenda, and international social movement. It presumes that extreme weather events and other effects of climate change will increasingly disrupt food, water, shelter, power, and social and governmental systems. These disruptions would likely or inevitably cause uneven societal collapse in the next few decades. The word “deep” indicates that strong measures are required to adapt to an unraveling of Western industrial lifestyles. The agenda includes values of nonviolence, compassion, curiosity, and respect, and a framework for constructive action.

Services start at 10:30 a.m.

We are open for in person services with masks and social distancing. In addition, the services are also available live via Zoom. Please send a request to [email protected] for the link.

Sunday, June 5, 2022

Scott Baldwin

Speaker – Scott Baldwin

Biography:

Scott Baldwin began his career as an English teacher in Lancaster, Pa., in 1970. In 1976, he earned a Ph.D. in Linguistics and Educational Research from Ohio University. From 1976 to 2012, Scott was employed as a faculty member, Department Chair, Dean of Education, and/or Dean of the Graduate School at four universities, including 17 years at the University of Miami in Coral Gables. He belongs to several local service organizations.

Topic: Critical Race Theory

This presentation is designed to define Critical Race Theory and provide factual information so that members of the audience can draw their own conclusions regarding the merits of CRT. Sources of information include published research, such as the Federal Reserve System’s Board of Governors’ FEDS Notes from Sept. 28, 2020, “Disparities in Wealth by Race and Ethnicity in the 2019 Survey of Consumer Finances,” and the “Human Genome Project,” as summarized in Wikipedia. Some of the source material is difficult, but will be presented so that colleagues without backgrounds in disciplines, such as law and research statistics, will be able to apply the information to their own areas of interest. The presentation will be followed by a live question- and-answer session.

Video won’t be available, per speaker’s request

Sunday, June 12, 2022

Alberita (Albie) Johnson

Speaker – Alberita (Albie) Johnson

Biography:

Alberita Johnson, “Albie,” is a lover of poetry and the arts. She considers life a series of journeys and looks forward to them all. As a curious being and seeker of religious and spiritual studies, Albie has served as minister, lay minister, and religious educator, prior to fully embracing Unitarian Universalism in 2016. She is currently seeking commissioning with the UUA and plans to return to seminary in 2023.

Topic: Taking the 5th “Silences Us All

We will share a brief history of the proposed UUA 8th principle, with a caveat pointing to inaction and denial as complicity to continued oppressions, thus “taking the 5th.” … One’s silence and or inaction stymies progress of us all. We will also examine the conflicting nature of both our 1st and 7th Principles, considering both our liberal faith and our struggle with relational theology that we believe is crucial to the concept of the 8th principle.

Sunday, June 19, 2022

Speaker – Arbuth Bumgarner

Arbuth Bumgarner

Arbuth Bumgarner has been a resident of Citrus County since 1995. He has created a successful real estate business, “Dream Citrus.” His tag line is “Come for a visit, stay for a lifetime.” He has earned certification as an international property specialist and a military relocation specialist. He is a member of the Citrus County Agricultural Alliance, the Citrus County Builder’s Association and a veteran of the U.S. Army. He is an active member of the Unity of Citrus Fellowship, currently serving as the board treasurer and is the leader of the Finance and Usher Teams. Arbuth and his wife, Annie, started an import company in 2003 and have been traveling to China extensively for the last 18 years. Bumgarner’s formal education includes horticulture, business administration, and religious studies, with a brief stint in seminary at the Illif School of Theology.

Topic: Crossroads

Have you ever had any choices to make?

Every choice we make is an example of a crossroad that is before you.

Can we pause and become aware of all the abundant choices that we can create and observe where we will go, depending on the choices and the energy that we have?

Can we explore all the many crossroads that we greet each and every day?

Can we proceed universally to recognize we are all part of this process and have a direct impact on our Divine World?

Video not available

Sunday, June 26, 2022

Speaker – UU Rev. Janet Onnie

UU Rev. Janet Onnie

Biography:

The Rev. Janet Onnie has supplied pulpits, trained congregations in lay pastoral care, and facilitated workshops on organizational and leadership development and conflict management. As an outspoken supporter of professional clergy, Rev. Onnie has served as a mentor and intern supervisor to ministers in formation and as a good officer to troubled ministries. She was named Minister Emerita of the Tri-County Unitarian Universalists (FL) and served first, as treasurer, then as president, of the Florida Chapter of the UU Ministers Association. As a founder of, and contributor to, interfaith organizations, she is a passionate advocate for social justice issues, in cooperation with interfaith partners and allies. She is a frequent contributor to newspapers and public forums. Rev. Onnie retired to Staunton, Va., in January 2021, where she continues to supply local pulpits and, via Zoom, served as sabbatical minister for a congregation in Canada. She also revived her pre-ministerial career as a professional musician, serving as volunteer coordinator for the local music festival, playing with the local community band, and mentoring young players in the local youth orchestra.

Topic: Countering Hate

Most Unitarian Universalists are aware that June is Pride Month, just as they are aware of the struggles of the GLBTQ+ community to gain their civil rights. And they know GLBTQ+ folx, especially Trans folx, continue to experience discrimination, undergirded by fear, and manifested by hatred. Today, we will broaden our discussion to consider how to counter the hatred that impacts not only the GLBTQ+ community, but all those who are deemed “different.”

Services start at 10:30 a.m.

We are open for in person services with masks and social distancing. In addition, the services are also available live via Zoom. Please send a request to [email protected] for the link.

Sunday, July 3, 2022

Dennis Wooldridge

Speaker – Dennis E. Wooldridge

Biography:

Dennis E. Wooldridge is a Navy veteran and spent his career in the broadcast industry. He is currently a member of the board of the Volusia/Flagler Chapter of the ACLU of Florida. He has been a member of the ACLU since 2016 and a longtime advocate of the importance of populace involvement in protecting civil freedoms guaranteed by the US Constitution.

Topic: What Does Independence Really Mean?

1. The history of Independence Day
2. What is the meaning of Independence Day?
3. Are our liberties at risk?
4. Warnings in history and literature
5. What can we do?

Sunday, July 10, 2022

Speaker – Deirdre Sweeney

Biography:

Deirdre Sweeney has been a nurse practitioner for 19 years. She is from Boston, and the majority of her career has been at Massachusetts General Hospital. She and her husband moved to Citrus County in January of 2016, after a record-setting snowfall in Boston. She currently works at Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa as a hospitalist. She also teaches for Simmons University in its Nurse Practitioner Program.

In September of 2021, the opportunity presented itself to become involved in the medical care of the thousands of refugees that were arriving from Afghanistan. She traveled back and forth between Citrus County and Fort Dix, N.J., for October, November, and December. She is joining us today to tell us about her experience.

Topic: Operation Allies Welcome: Helping Afghan Refugees

In the fall of 2021, Deirdre spent three months working for Task Force Liberty with Afghan Refugees at a military base in NJ. They provided many levels of medical care and also focused on completing the required medical immigration tasks so that the refugees could move off the base and be resettled in the USA. This presentation is about her experience with the refugees and the process.

Sunday, July 17, 2022

Speaker – Bree Hill

Bree Hill

Topic: Report on GA

Sunday, July 24, 2022

Speaker – The Rev. Bruce Seaman

The Rev. Bruce Seaman

Biography:

The Rev. Bruce Seaman is a retired Presbyterian Church, USA minister who has been long obsessed with today’s topic. After decades of church leadership, he believes he now has some solid direction. He is writing a book on this topic. He has been married for 41 years to Nancy, benefits coordinator for the 7,000 employees of the Marion County School Board. They have two adult children: newlywed Ray, who is a political activist in his own business, building websites and producing digital services while also doing land sales; and Rachel, who is a science education designer for online programs for the University of Florida.

Topic: Jesus Didn’t Ask for the Church: Designing a Servant Community Faithful to Jesus’ Teachings and Values

Church insiders and outsiders have long remarked at how the church, in general, is disconnected from the teachings of Jesus. It’s no secret. Look at writings from over a century ago and you will find the same complaints about this disconnection. With all the change that has occurred in society and in the church over all that time, it is remarkable that the complaints remain the same. Such resilience (or resistance) against modeling the teachings of Jesus indicates that the church has a flawed design. Indeed, the church is literally designed to produce outcomes disconnected from Jesus’ teachings and values. If the issue is design-based, then no amount of tinkering, revision, revival, or change will alter the outcomes. There needs to be a wholly different design for a faith community that takes seriously Jesus’ teachings and values. We will explore what a different design might be for a faith community in my presentation.

Sunday, July 31, 2022

Speaker – Rachel Newman

Topic: TBA

There weren’t any services during the month of August.

September 2022

Services start at 10:30 a.m.

We are open for in person services with masks and social distancing. In addition, the services are also available live via Zoom. Please send a request to [email protected] for the link.

Sunday, Sept. 4, 2022

Dr. Jeff Nall

Speaker – Dr. Jeff Nall

Biography:

Dr. Jeffrey Nall teaches philosophy and humanities courses for Indian River State College and the University of Central Florida. Nall also teaches courses in Florida Atlantic University’s Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Department. He recently began a Substack newsletter and Podcast devoted to exploring the insights of the humanities for everyday life. For more information, go to JeffreyNall.substack.com.

Topic: Bell Hooks’ Labors of Love: Critical Thinking and Courageous Conversation

On Dec. 15, 2021, the world lost one of the great public intellectual voices of our day: pioneering black feminist bell hooks. In this talk, Jeffrey Nall, Ph.D., shares insights from hooks’ feminist and anti-racist writing. He also highlights hooks’ timely advocacy of critical thinking, freedom of speech, and courageous dialogue. Against growing trends to ban books and “cancel” opposing views, hooks insisted that democracy required the maturity and courage to respectfully engage with precisely those views we find most mistaken. These commitments were bolstered by hooks’ uncommon humility and awareness of her own political and ethical inconsistencies. Above all, hooks joined the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in grounding her intellectual and political projects in an explicit ethic of love.

Sunday, Sept. 11, 2022

Amira Sims

Speaker – Amira Sims

Biography:

Amira Sims is a mother of four, college professor, spoken word artist, and lifelong learner. Starting at the ripe age of 8, she began keeping a journal. Ever since, she can remember she always wanted to be a teacher. Her childhood nickname was “school.” Even before graduating with her master’s degree in psychology, she guest-lectured at Valdosta State University. In 2003, she began teaching an array of psychology courses at the collegiate level. Many years later, in her 2019 TEDx Ocala talk, she shared that one of the reasons she consistently began to speak her poetry was thanks to one of her undergraduate college professors, who encouraged her to “keep writing, start sharing.”

Topic: Power, People, and Prose

Amira Sims will briefly discuss the power of words to shape minds, hearts, and behaviors. Amira will share a poem titled, “Transfer of Power Gone Wrong.” She will dissect the poem by highlighting the seven principles of Unitarian Universalism. She will be sure to highlight her thoughts on getting correct history into curricula.

Sunday, Sept. 18, 2022

Speaker – Art Jones

Art Jones

Art Jones has been working as a volunteer for the last 15 years on cleaning up and restoring springs in Crystal River, Homosassa, Weeki Wachee, and now, the Rainbow River. He is the founder and president of One Rake at a Time, Inc., a local 501(c)(3) nonprofit that has set its sights on restoring the Rainbow River to its original beauty. Through the One Rake at a Time initiative, started in 2009 and becoming a nonprofit in 2015, Art and his group have spent thousands of hours removing thousands of pounds of muck, algae, and invasive plants from our local waterways. For more information, visit https://onerakeatatime.org.

Topic: Save Our Waters

Florida are some of the most beautiful in the country. They are being invaded by hydrilla, lyngbya algae and other exotic weeds. How do we save them?

Sunday, Sept. 25, 2022

Speaker – Dee Collier

Dee Collier

Biography:

Dee Collier is a former elementary school teacher from Ocala, who loves drama and history. Those loves have led her to portray 25 famous women in history. There’s a board on a table that has pictures of her portraying some of them. You’re welcome to take one of her papers or cards and invite her to other groups as well.

Topic: Corrie ten Boom

Corrie ten Boom was the first female watchmaker in Europe, but that’s not what she was known for. She and her family were Christians who hid over 700 Jews and Jewish sympathizers in their home during WWII and helped them escape the horrors planned by the Nazis. Corrie, her sister Betsy, and their father were eventually caught and sent to prison, where her father died. The sisters were sent to a concentration camp, and Betsy died there. Corrie was released. She went on to tell her story of intrigue, pain and suffering, and then, forgiveness!

After the presentation, “Corrie” (Dee) will answer questions, remaining in character as Corrie ten Boom as if it were still 1979. Let’s listen in on this fascinating story as Dee Collier portrays Corrie ten Boom.

Services start at 10:30 a.m.

We are open for in person services with masks and social distancing. In addition, the services are also available live via Zoom. Please send a request to [email protected] for the link.

Sunday, Oct. 2, 2022

Rebecca Dominguez-Karimi

Speaker – Rebecca Dominguez-Karimi

Biography:

Rebecca Dominguez-Karimi is an oral historian, writer, podcaster, and public speaker. She holds a doctoral degree in comparative studies from Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton, and worked as an adjunct professor of English at Nova Southeastern University and Broward College in Fort Lauderdale. Her podcast, “The Tortilla Diaries,” highlights interviews from the Mexican American community of Texas and is taken from her “Treasures From Aztlan Oral History Project,” which she founded in 2006. It should be noted that her narrators all grew up during the Jim Crow era, a time when people of Mexican heritage suffered from segregation, discrimination, and racist practices, and she documents their stories of trauma.

Topic: Stories of Hispanic Immigrants: Journeys of Hope

Dr. Dominguez-Karimi will share video presentations of several immigrants (men and women) from different Hispanic countries. Narrators come from different socio-economic backgrounds, different age groups, and different political/economic situations. She will provide brief biographies of each narrator, followed by a video of them telling their story. We’ll hear them in their own words as they share their heartwarming stories of hardship, tragedy and hope.

Sunday, Oct. 9, 2022

Speaker – Jean McCauley

Sunday, Oct. 16, 2022

Dr. Jeff Nall

Speaker – Dr. Jeff Nall

Biography:

Jeffrey Nall teaches philosophy and humanities courses for Indian River State College and the University of Central Florida. Nall also teaches courses in Florida Atlantic University’s Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Department. He recently began a Substack newsletter and podcast devoted to exploring the insights of the humanities in everyday life. For more information, go to JeffreyNall.substack.com

Topic: Rev. King’s Other Dream: Ending Economic Injustice

Most people know the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. for his leading role in combating racism. But too few know he spent the last year of his life organizing a poor people’s march on Washington, D.C., that he hoped would rival the 1963 March on Washington, where he delivered his famed “I Have a Dream” speech. In this talk, Jeffrey Nall explores King’s frequently marginalized assessment of poverty and economic inequality in the context of today’s widening gap between rich and poor. King believed racism was just one part of three interlocking injustices that included militarism and the extreme materialism of the prevailing economic system. Nall makes the case for recognizing the merit in King’s contention that remedying economic injustice means promoting a “revolution of values” and committing ourselves to social transformation, rather than reform.

Sunday, Oct. 23, 2022

Dr. Jeff Nall

Speaker – Dr. Jeff Nall

Biography:

Jeffrey Nall teaches philosophy and humanities courses for Indian River State College and the University of Central Florida. Nall also teaches courses in Florida Atlantic University’s Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Department. He recently began a Substack newsletter and podcast devoted to exploring the insights of the humanities in everyday life. For more information, go to JeffreyNall.substack.com

Topic: The Fight for Economic Justice: From FDR to Coretta Scott King and the New Poor People’s Campaign

The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated before the planned 1968 Poor People’s encampment and march on Washington, D.C. Coretta Scott King continued the organizing effort following his death and delivered a too-little-known address challenging America to recognize the violence in its acts of omission and policy choices that harmed the poor. In this talk, Jeffrey Nall builds on his prior presentation to explore the efforts of Franklin D. Roosevelt, MLK, and Coretta Scott King to confront economic exploitation. He also discusses the emergence of a New Poor People’s Campaign, which took to the streets of Washington D.C. in the summer of 2022. Nall contends a failure to confront the class dimensions of social inequality imperils our democratic institutions and fuels neofascist populism. To preserve human dignity and democracy, we must join efforts to support workers’ rights and combat economic exploitation.

Sunday, Oct. 30, 2022

Rebecca Dominguez-Karimi

Speaker – Rebecca Dominguez-Karimi

Biography:

Rebecca Dominguez-Karimi is an oral historian, writer, podcaster, and public speaker. She holds a doctoral degree in comparative studies from Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton, and worked as an adjunct professor of English at Nova Southeastern University and Broward College in Fort Lauderdale. Her podcast, “The Tortilla Diaries,” highlights interviews from the Mexican American community of Texas and is taken from her “Treasures From Aztlan Oral History Project,” which she founded in 2006. It should be noted that her narrators all grew up during the Jim Crow era, a time when people of Mexican heritage suffered from segregation, discrimination, and racist practices, and she documents their stories of trauma.

Topic: Indigenismo, Traditions and Dia de los Muertos

What does Dia de Muertos mean for those of Mexican heritage? What’s the relevance of its concept on the continuity of life and on the importance of ancestors and remembrance? Learn about the ancient indigenous roots of Dia de Muertos, about its familiar and not-so-familiar traditions, and about the art and literary traditions surrounding this day of celebration. This presentation includes a PowerPoint and video presentation, along with poetry readings.

Services start at 10:30 a.m.

We are open for in person services with masks and social distancing. In addition, the services are also available live via Zoom. Please send a request to [email protected] for the link.

Sunday, Nov. 6, 2022

Rayna Alvarado

Speaker – Rayna Alvarado

Biography:

Today’s speaker, Rayna Alvarado, is a senior at Antioch College in Yellow Springs, Ohio. Currently, she is studying ecopsychology and Spanish in Mexico. She will define ecopsychology, explain what work can be done within the field, and her personal interests in such. It is important to know that young people are very interested in the environment and its interaction with people. Outside of academia, Rayna enjoys reading historical fiction, ceramic art, and walks in the beautiful Glen Helen Nature Preserve in Yellow Springs.

Topic: This Thing Called Ecopsychology

Sunday, Nov. 13, 2022

Speaker – To Be Announced

Sunday, Nov. 20, 2022

UU Rev. Carole Yorke

Speaker – UU Rev. Carole Yorke

Biography:

The Rev. Carole Yorke has been visiting us at NCUU since about 2000 and is delighted that we continue to invite her to guest preach. Now retired in Port St. Lucie with her three Pomeranians, she has served three churches in Florida. She was ordained in Plainfield, N.J., over 25 years ago, and continues to preach occasionally, do Memorial services, and lead Bereavement Groups at the UU Fellowship of Vero Beach.

Topic: The Law of Love: Blessing of the Animals

This service will be an extra special blessing for our pets this year. How many of them provided well-needed companionship as we all found our way through the pandemic? Either from the Fellowship or from home, we can now get to see all of your beloved pets. Bring your dogs, cats, birds, kangaroos (huh?) to be blessed. Bring pictures of deceased pets whom you want to remember.

Video will be uploaded when available

Sunday, Nov. 27, 2022

Speakers – Robert Keim and Rosemarie Grubba

Biography:

Robert Keim is the Lay Chaplain for Unitarian Universalist Church in the Pines in Brooksville and president of the congregation. He has a deep background in religion and Florida geography. Rosemarie Grubba is a trustee.

Topic: Water – A Spiritual Reality

This is a presentation on the spirituality and meaning of water to us and on why those of us in this part of the world should be focused on the meaning and value of water. If we would be asked what the phrase “spirituality of water” means, we would seek to explore meanings that are different for different people. We can agree that water is one of the powerful, necessary, life-sustaining classical elements (air, earth, water, and fire). Having water sets us apart from other planets in our solar system that are too hot or too cold to have liquid water, if they have any water at all. So, while our speaker may focus on water, he will also be speaking to the value and meaning of our interdependent web. Following his presentation, Rosemarie Grubba will speak briefly about an effort to produce an amendment to the Florida State Constitution guaranteeing citizens the right to clean, safe, water.

Video will be uploaded when available